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Open Source Meetup Tonight 6PM

Join us tonight at North Seattle College, for our first ever Open Source development meetup:

OpenSource Event

There will be free food and coffee (from Pilgrim Coffeehouse!).

Hope to see some of you there!

~Timothy

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Hi Neighbors!

We at LoveLicton wanted to wish you a happy Thanksgiving!

We have so much to be thankful for this year:

  • Our readers and community members that together make this a great place to call home.
  • Licton Springs Community Council as they've continued their great work of giving a unified voice to all community members and helping to lead community events (including the phenomenal Halloween event at Licton Springs Park).
  • ALUV who has been working tirelessly to improve the Aurora Corridor. Their latest work can be seen on the Aurora Ave N. pedestrian bridge art project.
  • Licton Springs P-Patch leadership really making our p-patch not only beautiful but a cornerstone of the community.
  • Licton-haller Greenways / Seattle Neighborhood Greenways working to make North Seattle and Licton Springs walkable and bikeable. They've been crucial in the creation of many Licton Springs Greenways such as the one nearing completion on N 100TH street, and have been working on North Seattle's pioneering Home Zone Pilot right here in Licton Springs.
  • Epic Life Church has consistently been there for the community. Allowing community meetings to be hosted in their church, leading a cleanup down along Aurora Ave N., and hosting community events.
  • Meridian Health Center which has served as the closest thing to a Licton Springs Community Center. They've hosted all the Licton Springs Community Council meetings, Mineral Springs Park meetings, and even community events such as Saturday's board game event.
  • Friends of Mineral Springs Park, Mineral Springs Disc Golf Club, and Seattle Parks and Recreation as they've worked to bring a strong sense of community to Seattle's only Disc Golf Park. This has lead to many events being held at the park and increased / more varied usage.
  • Pilgrim Coffee set up in Oak Tree Plaza when we needed them most and have been roasting and brewing excellent coffee for the community.
  • North Seattle College who've worked with the city and local community members to ensure a safe, appealing, and environmental conscience bridge is built from Licton Springs to the upcoming Northgate Lightrail Station. They've also been working with us to ensure Licton Springs and North Seattle College become a hotbed of Open Source innovation.
  • Northwest Danish Association beyond all the great work they do for our Danish residents, they opened up their doors on many occasions for community-wide events.
  • Buy Nothing Licton Springs who has done more than just provide a venue for the exchange of items, providing a forum for constructive community conversation, and the sharing of community events.
  • All the other countless local businesses and non-profits in Licton Springs.

We hope you enjoy the holiday with your family and loved ones!

And after the holiday and Black Friday shopping is over we hope to unwind with some of you over coffee and board games:

Board Game Event

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Home Zone Pilot Moves Forward

Significant progress has been made since we originally introduced the Licton Spring's Home Zone Pilot back in August. Just recently the City passed $350K in funding for Home Zone Pilots (the Licton Springs pilot being the first such in North Seattle), following an article about the project on Crosscut. If all goes well, some of this funding will help to compliment the Small Sparks grant the community was awarded for the project as well as funding received from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways. All of which, was accomplished after the community gave valuable input, shaping what such a project would look like in Licton Springs.

After discussion with the community and collection of initial traffic counts, we've coalesced on some simple initial steps:

  • Intersection / Street Art
  • Planters placed along the roads without sidewalks
  • Pedestrian Wayfinding / newsletter signs
  • A professionally performed traffic study

Despite the progress that has been made - walking around the neighborhood, for the most part, everything still looks untouched. While the community has identified many locations that they believe would be suitable for street art, it is not feasible to paint the street during Seattle's rainy season, leaving such work to wait for next year. And, while there have been some areas identified as potentially suitable for planters, this work will not begin until permits are secured and impacted households are contacted and give their direct approval.

Meanwhile, there is at least one physical reflection of the project, as the first prototype wayfinding sign was installed at the corner of N 88th and Burke Ave N right before Halloween:

Prototype wayfinding sign

The sign was constructed by volunteers using basic material and equipment:

  • A standard pre-treated 4 x 4 inch x 8 feet post.
  • Outdoor & weatherproof resilience paint from the Licton Spring's Sherwin Williams (6797 Jay Blue, 6740 Kilkenny, & 7077 Original White)
  • 2 inch and 1 inch white vinyl letters
  • 2 1/2 x 4 x 8 Hemlock Boards cut into 2 foot sections (for the direction signs)

During the construction of the sign, which costs well under $200 to build, significant lessons were learned that will be applied to any future wayfinding signs:

  • The directions were painted on one side of each direction sign, with a solid color on the other, this can lead to the wayfinding sign seeming blank from some angles. Future signs will be 4 inches longer and have the locations printed on both sides.
  • Some of the direction wood pieces split slightly where they were attached to the main post. Having the directions not use the 4 inches where the connection needs to be made, as well as making pilot holes into the connection points, should remedy this issue for future signs.
  • Over-sized rubber bands are an amazing tool to line up letters.
  • Stencils tend to bleed, and even if they don't they have an amateur appearance. Vinyl letters are cheap, easy, and if done right, resilient.
  • A clear coat, such as Polyurethane, should be applied after letters are placed to ensure they stay in place and offer extra protection against the elements.
  • These really are fun to make!

Finally, to both this wayfinding sign and future ones, we will be adding a brochure box where community members will always be able to physically pick up a community newsletter and know about upcoming events and happenings in the neighborhood.

Want a wayfinding sign in your lawn strip?

As part of the Home Zone project, there is an opportunity to get a wayfinding sign installed on your lawn strip! If you are interested, please sign up here. This opportunity is available to any homeowner within Licton Springs.

Want to help out?

Want to help move the project forward? Have artistic ability or are willing to help build planter boxes or signs? Willing to reach out to neighbors or host a meeting? Please sign up here!

What's next?

Over the next few months expect to see the first prototype planter/traffic calming measure installed. Expect opportunities to provide feedback on the initial traffic calming measures, as well as initially proposed street art. Then as, weather permits, expect street art painting to begin.

What do you think about the Home Zone project? Have any feedback on the initial wayfinding sign? We'd love to hear from you in the comments below!

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Looking for Volunteers for the Licton Springs Halloween Walk

Hi Neighbors!

A friend of the blog reached out to us to let us know that this year's Halloween Walk is looking for volunteers:

We are looking to recruit Friends of the Forest for this year's Licton Springs Halloween Walk - Do you or anyone you know like to dress up and give out treats? (The treats are provided.) Are your kids older and you miss seeing the young ones dressed up? Groups are welcome. You must be at least 12 years old to be a Friend or parents with children. Please contact Melanie at 206-227-9155 or email [email protected] if you can volunteer. The time commitment is from 4:15 to 6 pm. Hot cider provided.

Halloween

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Home Zone Meeting Gathers Valuable Community Input

Yesterday around 50 Licton Springs neighbors came together to provide input for the upcoming Home Zone pilot that targets the Southeast corner of Licton Springs.

Home Zone meeting draws in community

After a brief introduction about the desire of the pilot and the inherent limitations due to a small budget size, neighbors split up into groups to separately tackle traffic calming, community art, and wayfinding.

During the meeting the following existing areas of concern were identified:

  1. Significant and fast cut-through traffic through both Meridian and Corliss which, combined with lack of sidewalks, causes an impediment to pedestrian activity.
  2. Fast traffic is coming down the hill from 90th and Meridian to 90th and Burke. This area already has a lot of pedestrian activity, but speed combined with the lack of a safe intersection has already led to a collision and many near collisions with both pedestrians and other vehicles.
  3. Non-ideal crossing conditions at 90th and Wallingford. A child who attended the meeting shared their story of near collision occurring just a few days prior. Other areas near the school have flashing pedestrian signs, but this intersection lacks them. Proposal being explained

Proposal being explained

During the meeting, there was also concern expressed around a previous proposal to close Meridian off at 92nd with a "Do Not Enter" sign. Much of the concern centered around the fact that closing off the street could move the traffic onto other roads, in particular, Corliss, while not addressing walkability. This lined up well with much of the Anonymous feedback we received from our online survey:

  1. I don't understand the problem this is fixing. Closing Meridian does nothing for the 90th Street Burke hill, through which half the neighborhood drains out, will make the backup at 92nd & College worse, while causing daily irritation and delay for the other half of the neighborhood in getting home (or causing them to speed down the hill on 90th north of Meridian, too). Traffic calming on the Burke hill I'm all in favor of, but don't understand the benefit for the rest.

  2. With regard to the current proposal, at 92nd and Meridian I would prefer that it be a "local access only" sign instead of a one-way street / do not enter sign. I like the idea for the street planters, stop signs, speed bump at 90th and burke, and the street art at 88th and burke.

  3. The North Greenwood traffic calming maze is a nightmare. What do the residents over there think about having to drive many more blocks to get where they want or the increased east/west traffic down their formerly quiet residential streets? So I am skeptical about the proposed Home Pilot Program. The plan that the people living at the north end of Meridian to get home from College Way now, instead of a left turn, one block, right turn and into driveway, will be making a right turn, one block, stop, left turn 2 blocks, stop, left turn 2 blocks stop, left turn, weave among planters and finally home. Also, since I live on Corliss, I'm not happy at the prospect of increased traffic from cars trying to get to Meridian from the East. There are a LOT of pedestrians, (students, elderly, young families, dog walkers) that use our sidewalk-less street. I plan to make a count on a weekday to corroborate that statement. Are not the proposals to close off access to 85th at Meridian and put a stop sign at 90th sufficient to really cut down traffic volumes and speed? A Local Access Only sign at 92nd and Corliss is fairly meaningless. I hope you put the walking sign at the corner of the school grounds and not in someone's front yard. The speed bump crosswalk at N. 90th and Burke is fine if it is something the people in the houses at that corner feel is necessary. It is a residential intersection at the bottom of a steep hill with parked cars often making progress to Wallingford slow anyway. Cars SHOULD be crawling there. As for the proposed art, no comment until I see what and where.

  4. I like many of the ideas (stop signs and planters on Meridian Ave N), with the exception of blocking southbound access to Meridian Ave N at N 92nd street. The reason for not preferring this option is that in wintertime during snow conditions southbound access provides a safer route home (avoiding steep hills) and that blocking access would lengthen the drive through residential neighborhoods to get to my home. My observation is that most of the problem with fast cars driving through the neighborhood in the morning is due to northbound cars (not southbound cars). Thanks for your consideration.

After discussion, the community seemed to coalesce around the idea of working to limit speed on both Meridian and Corliss with inexpensive traffic calming measures, rather than entirely block access.

Many ideas were brought up to increase the walkability of the area including:

  • Intersection art at 90th and Burke Ave N. The hope is that this would clearly mark the intersection encouraging vehicles to slow down and yield for pedestrians.
  • Wayfinding signs in various forms throughout the neighborhood. Wayfinding signs
  • Traffic calming measures, such as strategically placed planters and/or chicanes, evenly applied on both Meridian and Corliss.
  • Setting up a weekly play street on one of the unsidewalked blocks.
  • Pedestrian activated crosswalk on 90th and Wallingford.

With the immediate next steps focused on art and wayfinding as traffic calming requires permit approval from SDOT and will take more time to put in place.

There is still plenty of time to provide feedback or get involved! To do so take the survey or email [email protected]. You can also keep up with the latest on the home zone at bit.ly/walkzone which I'll do my best to update as more input is gathered and proposals are modified or implemented.

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